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30 Seconds or Less

One significant element to consider when shooting a commercial is how long the spot is going to be. Longer productions require more filming and a greater amount of editing, so it would stand to reason that they would be trickier to produce, right? Not necessarily. We have found that it can be quite difficult to communicate an idea in 15-30 seconds. When you think about taking a complex message and stripping it down to the bare bones in order to fit time constraints, you can understand how greater thought and effort might be required to create a comprehensible and entertaining message.

If that’s still not making sense, let me use an analogy to elucidate. Think about a sonnet, which is generally fourteen lines, and condensing it’s message to a haiku, which is just three lines.

This is an example of an Italian Sonnet:
Within the warmth of home, I sit amazed
at the gentle fall of snow through window pane.
Cup of tea in hand, my layered thoughts unchain,
and tumble from the tip of tongue unfazed
to land upon a pristine page appraised,
aided by the silent fall through snowy pane.
Oh, the soft white wintry glow ‘pon the lane
leaves a graceful drape, Lord be praised.
Within the warmth of home, I muse on themes
of days to come and those gone bye and so,
I thank the Lord for all of nature’s schemes,
for the gift of time, for peace, and for the snow.
Oh, make the blanket deep, I wish to dream,
may all my days and ‘morrows have this glow.

I took it upon myself to convert this sonnet to a Haiku. Be mindful that I am not a poet, so my rendition is passable at best. Yet it took me near ten minutes to come up with these three simple lines – seventeen words – to sum up the essence of the sonnet:

Snow falls against window pane
In the warmth I muse nature’s wonders
Thanking God for ‘morrow’s glow

Now just imagine trying to turn an ESSAY into a haiku. That’s what it’s like when you have an extremely dense topic that needs to be simplified for production. To put it in different terms, think about how movie trailer producers have to capture the major themes of a feature length film in a very short amount of time. Usually, there’s one or more versions of the  trailer that are anywhere from one to three minutes that play in theaters, but there’s also an even more abridged version of that made for television. For example, take the various trailers for Wes Anderson’s 2014 film The Grand Budapest Hotel. The first is the official trailer which runs 2:26 minutes. The second is the television spot which is only 31 seconds.

Think about the creative decisions that had to be made in order to convey essentially the same message in a quarter of the amount of time. What did they include from the original trailer and what did they leave out? Were these wise cuts or could they have been better? If you’ve seen the film, how was the trailer as a whole? Did it adequately sum up the film? Did it entice you to go see it if you hadn’t already?

These are just a few of the many questions a producer has to consider when making creative choices about what to include and what to leave out in a short TV spot.

Alyssa Rudisill

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Jingles All the Way

Imagine: you’re lounging on the couch watching the Panthers dominate in last Sunday’s football game. At the halftime commercial break, you hear the distinctive voice of your worker on television. Suddenly you realize…it’s YOUR commercial! That’s the experience our CEO, Russ Reynolds, had last weekend when the spot for the Leith Toyota came on. Screen Shot 2014-07-10 at 12.40.26 PMLeith came to us with the request to include a jingle in their commercial that was catchy and would get viewers’ attention. So like a dutiful production company, we started brainstorming how to produce a commercial incorporating a memorable tune that would run through viewers’ heads and entice them to head over to Leith. We took our inspiration from other popular commercial jingles and eventually came up with an idea that we thought would appeal to consumers. Not only did we do the instrumental work and recording, but we even gathered up half our team and got them in the audio booth to start chanting. The vocals you hear belong to none other than a group of diversely talented Blueforest Studios staff. We even coerced our account manager, Meredith Duncan, into sipping pepsi and milk on-camera (it was supposed to look like an iced latte). This is one way in which we’re demonstrating how dedicated we are to producing the best possible product for our clients. We’ll go the extra mile to ensure that what you receive is the pinnacle of our creative abilities. Check out the Leith commercial below and let us know what you think! If you’re interested in having a video that features a catchy jingle, give us a call - we’d love to help you in any way we can.

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Carolina Ale House TV Commercial Part 1

Just as 2010 drew to a close, our creative department launched what would become one of our most successful videos. This of course was our process video, which you can check out here. With this playful and imaginative video we were able to give potential clients insight into how we work, as well as a taste of our humorous side.

Storyboard for Carolina Ale House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to our process video we won the opportunity to work with Carolina Ale House, a great sports themed restaurant based in Raleigh with locations all over the Southeast. Check out their site and take a look at that delicious Triple B Burger. YUM!

The challenge was to create a 30 second TV spot that incorporated the restaurant’s theme of “Food, Sports, Fun.”  After several creative meetings we decided on an idea that centered around talking food and a fun roller coaster ride that would end not so well for our food protagonists but excellent for customers. It was a fun idea that meshed food beauty shots with a thrilling ride that showcased what the restaurant was all about. Our three food stars were originally: Triple B Burger, Caribbean Fish tacos and Buffalo Chicken Salad.

Once Carolina Ale said “go”, there was a flurry of creative meetings, story boarding, and hands on rig building.  The main idea was to have the plated food zooming through the restaurant on a tray enjoying what would become its last bit of fun before a delicious and agonizing end with plenty of napkins needed. To accomplish these shots we built a tray mount for the camera and used our Canon T2i paired with a fantastic 14mm f2.8. We were ready to shoot.

Stay tuned for Part Deux, the exciting conclusion…