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Introducing: Bailey’s – Experience Elegance

We were thrilled when we received a call from Bailey’s and they said they were considering using us for their upcoming holiday campaign.  Who in this market hasn’t heard of the Bailey Box?  They are great marketers and we were honored to have a chance to develop a holiday TV spot for their company.  And, the fact that they let our team stretch their creative muscles made it that much more enjoyable. It’s an elegant and unique video that combines animation and live action, view below!

 

 

The purpose of this video was not only to unveil their completely redesigned store but to convey the feeling of shopping at Bailey’s in a memorable and unique way.

 

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We shot all footage using a the Red Epic 4K camera riding on a Ronin 3-Axis stabilizer to get that floating feeling to the footage.  We decided on shots that were bright and sunny for the outdoor shots.

 

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We designed a animated female character and used several techniques to make it feel as though she was really part of the scene but at the same time feel as though she were part of the viewers imagination.  The character is designed to convey a stylish, carefree spirit.

The result is a commercial that stands out from other jewelry commercials in a memorable way.

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Blueforest Gives Back – Triangle Nonprofit Video Giveaway

We love a great story! And, we know that many nonprofit agencies have great stories about why they were founded, the people that they serve, and the impact that they are making in the community. That’s just one of the reasons we love working with nonprofit organizations. In the past, we’ve received many requests from nonprofits for our services. Sometimes we can offer a discount or even do a video for free but the process has been based on timing and luck more than anything else. Now – we’re creating a process by which we can award a video to one local nonprofit agency annually. Our criteria won’t just be who can get the most likes, although social media will play a small part. It will be a holistic view of the agency – who has the story that will get the most traction – who can benefit most from a great video. This is our way of giving back to the community with what we do best, making an awesome video!

GivesBack

We are holding our First Annual Blueforest Gives Back Video Giveaway! We will produce a free video ($5,000 – $10,000 value) in 2015 for one amazing local nonprofit organization. All other nonprofits are eligible for a 10% discount and all applicants will get free basic YouTube Optimization on a project purchased from Blueforest Studios by the end of 2015! We are an Integrated Video Production company after all and we want to make sure that your target audience can find your video online!

This giveaway is open to all 501(c)(3) nonprofits who serve and are located in the Triangle.

Wondering what kind of video you can win? Here’s a video that we produced for the AHA a few years ago – it’s a powerful story with a strong message.

Look for more samples at the end of the post.

Criteria:
A GREAT Cause! – We’re looking for a unique 501 (c) (3) organization.
Located in the Triangle!- This allows us to work together locally for meetings and filming, together helping our community.
Financially Sound – Looking for an agency with a solid track record.
Active Online! – The non-profit we work with needs a social media presence to kickstart the sharing of the video.

If this sounds like you, then please apply here (by January 31, 2015)!

Once you’ve sent in your application, it’s time to show us exactly what you’re made of.
The next step is to tell us why you think your organization should win. Tell us your STORY.

Tweet with the hashtag #BlueforestGivesBack why you want and deserve a video!
Share any of your promotions (blog, pics, projects) on your organization’s Twitter or Google+ with everything you want us to see and tag us @BlueForestVideo and #BlueforestGivesBack

Timeline:
DEADLINE for application – January 31
Top 10 selected – February 28th
Top 3 announced – March 15th
WINNER announced – March 30th

Here are a few more samples that we’d love to provide to the winner. This video featuring graphics, animation and kinetic type for the NC Craft Brewers Guild could definitely fit within the allotted budget.

Here’s another that we created for the Lung Cancer Initiative.

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5 Tips for Fundraising Videos

You’ve been asked to raise money at an upcoming event. Sounds simple enough, right? But, then you start to think about all of the little things you need to do to make the event a success. Things start to get a bit overwhelming. How do you thank your current donors and also make them inspired to continue to give in the future?

As an integrated video production company we’ve had great success helping nonprofits produce videos in order to raise awareness, funds, and achieve their marketing goals. The upfront investment costs are just that, an investment. When you see stats over and over again that say the human mind processes images and stories so much more effectively than text, it’s easy to understand why a video works. So here are some tips for when it’s time to prepare that video:

1. Include a relatable character – This could be a real person, an animated character, or the narrator but, it needs to be a person whom your audience can relate to. Most people will likely feel empathy for whomever you choose.

2. Emotional pull – If you are involved in a nonprofit you probably know some great stories about how your organization has helped others. These stories can really make an impact when told in an engaging way. Likely your cause does awesome things. But everybody might not know what those things are. Here’s your chance to tell them.

3. Include something positive at the end – You could be telling a story that contains a sad situation or a situation that’s uncomfortable, but there needs to be something hopeful at the end. Something that shows passion. Something that shows a difference can be made. Something to show a conflict was resolved or can/will be with help.

4. It’s not always about making $ – Even though you are hosting a fundraising event you may not want to blatantly slap the call to action everywhere. People understand you are trying to raise money. They’ve either given money or time in the past or are interested in giving in the future. This is one time the call to action can be a little bit disguised.

5. Be truthful – This should be a given, but I think it deserves to be said. Sometimes people are skeptical about where their money is going. If it’s not going directly to the cause, then you might want to mention that. Most people understand that there are administrative costs involved with any non-profit but they want as much of their funds as possible to go to the cause so just be clear about what the percentage is if that’s appropriate.

These are just a few things that will help you achieve success for your fundraising event. Have more questions? Feel free to reach out! We’re happy to assist in any way we can.

If you are curious about some of our experience with fundraising videos click here to see some we’ve produced.

Here’s one of our favorites, for the American Heart Association, that follows the 5 tips above.

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What goes where? – Composition Basics

Maybe you watched our documentary on NCRLA, and wondered about setting up a video interview, maybe not. Regardless, I wanted to share a few basic tips when composing your shot for a video interview. First off, you need to pick a place for the interview. Often times, people will want to do an interview in a certain room because they think the room is their most impressive or comfortable or just “looks the best.” However, it is important to remember that with a video interview, you will only see a very small portion of the room. So, you only need to have a small section of the room “look the best.”

When choosing a location, keep in mind that you want to have at least a few feet between the camera and the interviewee and at least a few feet between the interviewee and the background. Sometimes this is easier said than done, but it will give you a better depth of field and keep your subject from blending it with the background. (Note: in a tiny nutshell, depth of field refers to how much of the image is in focus.)

So after you pick a location, you want to choose where to put the subject in the frame. There is a pretty simple guideline for this called the Rule of Thirds. If you divide the frame in to thirds both horizontally and vertically with lines, you want to have your subject in one of the intersection points of the lines. You can look at this picture of a puppy for an adorable example of the Rule of Thirds:

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 Next, you want to light the scene properly, for more information on that, watch this video we made on lighting basics.

After you have your subject lit beautifully and properly placed in the frame, you will want to eliminated anything distracting from the frame. Sometimes, what is not in the shot is just as important as what is in the shot. If you are interviewing someone at a messy desk, you might want to have a tighter (closer) shot that doesn’t show much of the desk. Or, you might want to clean the desk. Also, if there is a window or other really bright object like a lamp in the shot, you might want to move the shot the those objects are out of the frame. Simply put, you want to make sure the viewer is NOT going to be paying attention to something in the frame that isn’t your subject.

These are just a few basic ideas that can help improve a video interview on the visual side of things, but don’t forget about audio. For more on audio in video read this.

If you have any questions of this topic or other video ideas, let me know in the comments section. Thanks!

Bryan Reklis
Video Producer

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Choose Blueboost

What is Blueboost?

You may have heard us refer to ourselves as an integrated video production company and wondered to yourself, “what exactly does that mean?” Well, it has a lot to do with a service we offer called Blueboost. Blueboost is a 27-point proven process for optimizing the amazing video we’ve Screen Shot 2014-09-25 at 3.39.12 PMproduced in order for you to achieve maximum return on your investment.

Why is this necessary?

We’ve learned from experience that there’s a disconnect between video production companies and marketing teams. Sure, you put a lot of money into making a great promotional video or commercial, but what does that matter when nobody sees it? Or worse – no one acts on it? Blueboost is a part of our process to make sure that doesn’t happen. Not only will we ensure that you get the highest quality of video, we’ll make absolutely sure that people actually see it.

How can I learn more?

Watch the video below! You can also give us a call or shoot us an email! We would love to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your video production experience in greater detail.

(919) 832-2220                                                                               sales@blueforeststudios.com

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The “Good” in Goodbye

For nearly a year and a half, I’ve had the immense pleasure of interning for Blueforest headshotStudios. What started as a simple Google search for “Raleigh Video Production Companies” turned into one of the greatest learning opportunities of my college experience. I’m so grateful for the experience I’ve harnessed and the connections I’ve acquired that have made all the difference in preparing me for my future career.

Looking back on my knowledge-base entering this internship as an unexperienced sophomore, I’m amazed at the vast skew of responsibilities that I’ve come to be familiar with and consider part of my “skill set.”  I’ve composed tweets and posts, I’ve created web campaigns and newsletters. I’ve assisted with video shoots and participated as the occasional background extra when necessary. I’ve researched, analyzed, and optimized to my heart’s content. SEO used to be a foreign term, now it’s part of my daily vernacular. I’ve Youtubed (no, not stupid cat videos. Well, okay, maybe one or two). I’ve planned and executed our open house, seminars, and other events. And I’ve blogged. Oh, how I’ve blogged.

I consider myself incredibly blessed that I not only had the opportunity to learn each of these tasks, but that I was immediately entrusted with almost-complete responsibility to conduct them adequately. I have so much gratitude for my superiors who left these assignments in my subordinate hands without questioning or impugning my abilities. They bestowed in me a confidence and desire to perform to the best of my ability given that I’d been so effortlessly entrusted.

Of course, it wasn’t ALL work. Blueforest Studios taught me that the workplace can also be a lot of fun. Not a holiday nor birthday passes that we don’t celebrate. We prank. We potluck. I’m proud to say I was on the winning team of our State Fair scavenger hunt. The people here don’t just work hard, they play hard. More than that, there’s sense of community between coworkers here that made me feel as if I was amongst friends. That’s 53dc1054fab9d87a51e360cchard to come by, and I’m fortunate to have had the pleasure of working amongst professionals that were equal parts talented and kindhearted.

Even though this will be my final blog post, I know this is only the beginning of great things for the company. When I started my internship, we were Atlantic Creative. Over the course of my employment, I’ve been able to watch the company flourish and take on new and exciting changes. We’ve undergone office transitions and rebranding endeavors. I’d like to think that I played a role in helping Blueforest Studios grow in this industry in the same way they helped me grow as a professional.

The knowledge and experience I gained from my internship are invaluable, and I’ll always be extremely grateful for my mentors that provided this opportunity. I want to express my HUGE thanks to the entire Blueforest Studios team. You guys are the best!

Alyssa Rudisill

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Video Tips for Beginners

3This Wednesday, October 15th, we will hold our next monthly seminar on learning the basics of creating internal videos. We know that many professionals are tasked with the burden of making in-house videos even though they might lack the necessary skills for doing so. An important fact to note is that the quality of your video says a lot about the quality of your product or service. Just because you don’t use a professional video service to produce your video doesn’t mean it can’t look professional, as long as you put the time and effort into following some basic beginner shooting rules.

 

Lighting

It’s likely that you won’t have the necessary equipment to properly light a shot, so it’s important to know what kind of natural light is the best for shooting in. In general, direct sunlight is going to create intense shadows and is not a flattering option. The exception is early morning or late evening, often referred to as “Golden Hour. ” Typically, overcast days provide complimentary lighting. You can also buy a cheap reflector (such as a piece of white poster-board) to fill in shadows. If, on the other hand, you do have access to lighting equipment, check out this blog on basic lighting tips.

Support

Don’t skimp on the tripod. This is one of the most important purchases you will make, so choose wisely. Tripods come in two parts that you’ll typically have to buy separately: the legs, also called “sticks,” and the head. Buy legs that will support twice the maximum weight of your camera and a fluid head that will allow you to pan and tilt smoothly. It’s a common beginner mistake to buy a cheap tripod, and it shows. Don’t be that person.

Plan your Shots

Whether this is in the form of a storyboard or just a shot list, it’s good to have a clear idea of what shots you want to include and the best way to capture them. The more you practice, the better sense you’ll have of seeing shots as the camera sees them.

Composition

Picture an imaginary grid with two vertical lines and two horizontal lines dividing your shot into nine equal sections. The Rule-of-Thirds states that for the most interesting shot, subjects should be placed at the points of intersection on the grid. This is a good basic rule to follow when planning how things should be placed in a shot.

Movement

If you’re going to do matched-action shots, (someone starts an action and the camera cuts to a shot of the action continuing from a different angle), make sure that you shoot the complete action from both angles. A common mistake is shooting from one angle only up to where you think you’re going to cut, then starting the action in the middle from the next angle. The problem with this is that it’s really difficult to get the exact positioning correct. It’s often obvious when the action isn’t matched perfectly, resulting in a jump cut. It’s possible to use jump cuts purposefully to convey meaning, but oftentimes this isn’t what the director is going for and it just creates confusion and pulls your viewer out of the story.

 

These are just a few concepts to keep in mind when shooting. For a more extensive, hands-on learning experience, register for our Video Production for Beginners seminar. We hope to see you there!

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(blue)Boost Your Resume

Does working in the video production or marketing industry interest you? Are you wondering what sort of jobs exist in these fields or what local companies have to offer? We’re often approached with inquiries about what kind of jobs Blueforest Studios has to offer, and while we aren’t hiring any full-time employees at the moment, we wanted to take a moment to let anyone who’s interested know about what kind of opportunities exist in this market.

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Creative Director – This is a vital role in the product development process. Creative directors must have a creative vision and the ability to lead their team of artists. They must also have a head for business and be able to direct activities of the company to maintain a standard of creative excellency, timeliness, and profitability while meeting the clients’ needs.

Video Producer – This person is coordinates all the different aspects of a video’s production. A video producer with clients and the production staff to produce a variety of videos. He or she plans and executes video shoots as well as post-production tasks such as making editorial decisions.

Audio Producer – An audio producer must be familiar with technology and equipment needed to record, mix, and produce sound on videos. This may include adding sound effects, voiceovers, or background music. They may also be responsible for operating audio equipment on shoots.

Illustrator – This person uses creative skills to communicate a story, message or idea. This could include producing drawings, diagrams, or other images that help make products more attractive or easier to understand.

Account Executive – An account executive serves as the direct link between a company and it’s clients. This person builds sales by prospecting for new clients and generates future profits by nurturing existing customer relationships.

4.1.1Although we currently have an awesome staff to fill these positions, we are looking for a few new Sales, Marketing, and Audio Interns. These individuals would have the opportunity to learn the ins and outs of working in the respected positions for a video production company.

Sales and Marketing interns would assist in the creation and distribution of marketing materials, perform analysis of marketing and sales data, and provide support to social media efforts. This person should have excellent written and verbal communication skills and knowledge of the Web and social media.

An audio intern would assist with the daily operations of audio production and work alongside our experienced audio producer. Ideally, this person would have some familiarity with basic audio practices such as editing and mixing. Additionally, they should be able to take direction well and learn new tools quickly.

Interested applicants should email their resume and cover letter to:

Kathy AT Blueforeststudios

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Better Safe Than Sorry

Have you ever seen a commercial where an important piece of information, such as a website or phone number, wasn’t fully displayed on the screen? This is a big problem that not nearly enough production companies pay attention to. The issue here is that footage isn’t being edited with respect to Center Cut Protection.

What’s Center Cut Protection?

Great question! This applies to Standard Definition footage that was filmed in High Definition. HD is meant to be viewed in 16:9 aspect ratio, however SD is only 4:3. So since many SD channels still exist, footage edited in HD need to be down converted in order to be aired on these channels. Specifically, Center Cut Protection refers to graphics or text that’s edited into commercial spots. In the photo on the left, you can see how HD footage is supposed to be viewed, with the website clearly within the safe areas. The photo on the left, however, shows how that same footage would be viewed on an SD channel. In this medium, the website gets cut off.

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How do I fix CCP errors?

It’s important to be cognizant of title safe and action safe areas. These are lines that indicate that what’s within the boundaries will be completely viewable by audiences. Anything outside is at risk of being cut off depending on the viewers’ TV. These areas differ for HD and SD.

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In this photo, the outer line is the Action Safe area and the inner is the Title Safe area. The tiny vertical dashes on each line represent the Center Cut Protection.

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I’m sure that at some point you’ve been watching TV and the screen appeared like the one above, with black bars on the top and bottom. This is to keep HD in 16:9 aspect, even though it’s being displayed in a 4:3 frame. Some channels want to get rid of these bars and adjust the picture to 4:3, like the photo below.

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In this photo, the blue lines coincide with the small dashes in the first photo. This is why it’s important to stick to Center Cut Protection when editing for SD. Because while your normal safe boundaries may be ok for HD, when that same footage is viewed in SD you may lose important information. This makes the commercial less credible, and thus, your company in the eyes of your client.

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TAB/Smart State Use Video to Grow Their Business

Keith Weaver is an established business coach for conjoined business advisor companies, The Alternative Board and Smart State. He came to us for assistance in creating a tool that would help him get meetings and close deals. Though he’s very good at his job, he was looking for something that would address prospects’ fears and issues – ones that they might not even want to speak about – such as the business problems that keeps them up at night.

Here’s the video that our team created.

After implementing the video into his sales process Keith has been very pleased. Here is what he had to say:

Screen Shot 2014-08-25 at 9.53.35 AMWhen I needed a boost to my revenue growth, I turned to Blueforest Studios. They developed and produced the perfect video as part of my marketing strategy to attract more clients. In the two years since I began using the video my business is up over 43%. Anyone can make a video these days but very few know how to tell your story or deliver your message in a compelling fashion that gets viewed and truly impacts the bottom line.

Keith Weaver, CEO
Smart State, LLC

http://www.smart-state.com/